How Do We Find Out The Installed Packages Came From Which Repository?

Sometimes you might want to know the installed packages came from which repository. This will helps you to troubleshoot when you are facing the package conflict issue.

Because third party vendor repositories are holding the latest version of package and sometime it will causes the issue when you are trying to install any packages due to incompatibility.

Everything is possible in Linux because you can able to install a packages on your system even though when the package is not available on your distribution.

Also, you can able to install a package with latest version when your distribution don’t have it. How?

That’s why third party repositories are came in the picture. They are allowing users to install all the available packages from their repositories.

Almost all the distributions are allowing third party repositories. Some of the distribution officially suggesting few of third party repositories which are not replacing the base packages badly like CentOS officially suggesting us to install EPEL repository.

List of Major repositories and it’s details are below.

  • CentOS: EPEL, ELRepo, etc is CentOS Community Approved Repositories.
  • Fedora: RPMfusion repo is commonly used by most of the Fedora users.
  • ArchLinux: ArchLinux community repository contains packages that have been adopted by Trusted Users from the Arch User Repository.
  • openSUSE: Packman repo offers various additional packages for openSUSE, especially but not limited to multimedia related applications and libraries that are on the openSUSE Build Service application blacklist. It’s the largest external repository of openSUSE packages.
  • Ubuntu: Personal Package Archives (PPAs) are a kind of repository. Developers create them in order to distribute their software. You can find this information on the PPA’s Launchpad page. Also, you can enable Cananical partners repositories.

What Is Repository?

A software repository is a central place which stores the software packages for the particular application.

All the Linux distributions are maintaining their own repositories and they allow users to retrieve and install packages on their machine.

Each vendor offered a unique package management tool to manage their repositories such as search, install, update, upgrade, remove, etc.

Most of the Linux distributions comes as freeware except RHEL and SUSE. To access their repositories you need to buy a subscriptions.

Why do we need to enable third party repositories?

In Linux, installing a package from source is not advisable as this might cause so many issues while upgrading the package or system that’s why we are advised to install a package from repo instead of source.

How Do We Find Out The Installed Packages Came From Which Repository on RHEL/CentOS Systems?

This can be done in multiple ways. Here we will be giving you all the possible options and you can choose which one is best for you.

Method-1: Using Yum Command

RHEL & CentOS systems are using RPM packages hence we can use the Yum Package Manager to get this information.

YUM stands for Yellowdog Updater, Modified is an open-source command-line front-end package-management utility for RPM based systems such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and CentOS.

Yum is the primary tool for getting, installing, deleting, querying, and managing RPM packages from distribution repositories, as well as other third-party repositories.

# yum info apachetop
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror
Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile
 * epel: epel.mirror.constant.com
Installed Packages
Name        : apachetop
Arch        : x86_64
Version     : 0.15.6
Release     : 1.el7
Size        : 65 k
Repo        : installed
From repo   : epel
Summary     : A top-like display of Apache logs
URL         : https://github.com/tessus/apachetop
License     : BSD
Description : ApacheTop watches a logfile generated by Apache (in standard common or
            : combined logformat, although it doesn't (yet) make use of any of the extra
            : fields in combined) and generates human-parsable output in realtime.

The apachetop package is coming from epel repo.

Method-2: Using Yumdb Command

Yumdb info provides information similar to yum info but additionally it provides package checksum data, type, user info (who installed the package). Since yum 3.2.26 yum has started storing additional information outside of the rpmdatabase (where user indicates it was installed by the user, and dep means it was brought in as a dependency).

# yumdb info lighttpd
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror
lighttpd-1.4.50-1.el7.x86_64
     checksum_data = a24d18102ed40148cfcc965310a516050ed437d728eeeefb23709486783a4d37
     checksum_type = sha256
     command_line = --enablerepo=epel install lighttpd apachetop aria2 atop axel
     from_repo = epel
     from_repo_revision = 1540756729
     from_repo_timestamp = 1540757483
     installed_by = 0
     origin_url = https://epel.mirror.constant.com/7/x86_64/Packages/l/lighttpd-1.4.50-1.el7.x86_64.rpm
     reason = user
     releasever = 7
     var_contentdir = centos
     var_infra = stock
     var_uuid = ce328b07-9c0a-4765-b2ad-59d96a257dc8

The lighttpd package is coming from epel repo.

Method-3: Using RPM Command

RPM command stands for Red Hat Package Manager is a powerful, command line Package Management utility for Red Hat based system such as (RHEL, CentOS, Fedora, openSUSE & Mageia) distributions.

The utility allow you to install, upgrade, remove, query & verify the software on your Linux system/server. RPM files comes with .rpm extension. RPM package built with required libraries and dependency which will not conflicts other packages were installed on your system.

# rpm -qi apachetop
Name        : apachetop
Version     : 0.15.6
Release     : 1.el7
Architecture: x86_64
Install Date: Mon 29 Oct 2018 06:47:49 AM EDT
Group       : Applications/Internet
Size        : 67020
License     : BSD
Signature   : RSA/SHA256, Mon 22 Jun 2015 09:30:26 AM EDT, Key ID 6a2faea2352c64e5
Source RPM  : apachetop-0.15.6-1.el7.src.rpm
Build Date  : Sat 20 Jun 2015 09:02:37 PM EDT
Build Host  : buildvm-22.phx2.fedoraproject.org
Relocations : (not relocatable)
Packager    : Fedora Project
Vendor      : Fedora Project
URL         : https://github.com/tessus/apachetop
Summary     : A top-like display of Apache logs
Description :
ApacheTop watches a logfile generated by Apache (in standard common or
combined logformat, although it doesn't (yet) make use of any of the extra
fields in combined) and generates human-parsable output in realtime.

The apachetop package is coming from epel repo.

Method-4: Using Repoquery Command

repoquery is a program for querying information from YUM repositories similarly to rpm queries.

# repoquery -i httpd

Name        : httpd
Version     : 2.4.6
Release     : 80.el7.centos.1
Architecture: x86_64
Size        : 9817285
Packager    : CentOS BuildSystem 
Group       : System Environment/Daemons
URL         : http://httpd.apache.org/
Repository  : updates
Summary     : Apache HTTP Server
Source      : httpd-2.4.6-80.el7.centos.1.src.rpm
Description :
The Apache HTTP Server is a powerful, efficient, and extensible
web server.

The httpd package is coming from CentOS updates repo.

How Do We Find Out The Installed Packages Came From Which Repository on Fedora System?

DNF stands for Dandified yum. We can tell DNF, the next generation of yum package manager (Fork of Yum) using hawkey/libsolv library for back-end. Aleš Kozumplík started working on DNF since Fedora 18 and its implemented/launched in Fedora 22 finally.

Dnf command is used to install, update, search & remove packages on Fedora 22 and later system. It automatically resolve dependencies and make it smooth package installation without any trouble.

$ dnf info tilix
Last metadata expiration check: 27 days, 10:00:23 ago on Wed 04 Oct 2017 06:43:27 AM IST.
Installed Packages
Name         : tilix
Version      : 1.6.4
Release      : 1.fc26
Arch         : x86_64
Size         : 3.6 M
Source       : tilix-1.6.4-1.fc26.src.rpm
Repo         : @System
From repo    : updates
Summary      : Tiling terminal emulator
URL          : https://github.com/gnunn1/tilix
License      : MPLv2.0 and GPLv3+ and CC-BY-SA
Description  : Tilix is a tiling terminal emulator with the following features:
             : 
             :  - Layout terminals in any fashion by splitting them horizontally or vertically
             :  - Terminals can be re-arranged using drag and drop both within and between
             :    windows
             :  - Terminals can be detached into a new window via drag and drop
             :  - Input can be synchronized between terminals so commands typed in one
             :    terminal are replicated to the others
             :  - The grouping of terminals can be saved and loaded from disk
             :  - Terminals support custom titles
             :  - Color schemes are stored in files and custom color schemes can be created by
             :    simply creating a new file
             :  - Transparent background
             :  - Supports notifications when processes are completed out of view
             : 
             : The application was written using GTK 3 and an effort was made to conform to
             : GNOME Human Interface Guidelines (HIG).

The tilix package is coming from Fedora updates repo.

How Do We Find Out The Installed Packages Came From Which Repository on openSUSE System?

Zypper is a command line package manager which makes use of libzypp. Zypper command provides functions like repository access, dependency solving, package installation, etc.

$ zypper info nano

Loading repository data...
Reading installed packages...


Information for package nano:
-----------------------------
Repository     : Main Repository (OSS)             
Name           : nano                               
Version        : 2.4.2-5.3                          
Arch           : x86_64                             
Vendor         : openSUSE                           
Installed Size : 1017.8 KiB                         
Installed      : No                                 
Status         : not installed                      
Source package : nano-2.4.2-5.3.src                 
Summary        : Pico editor clone with enhancements
Description    :                                    
    GNU nano is a small and friendly text editor. It aims to emulate
    the Pico text editor while also offering a few enhancements.

The nano package is coming from openSUSE Main repo (OSS).

How Do We Find Out The Installed Packages Came From Which Repository on ArchLinux System?

Pacman command stands for package manager utility. pacman is a simple command-line utility to install, build, remove and manage Arch Linux packages. Pacman uses libalpm (Arch Linux Package Management (ALPM) library) as a back-end to perform all the actions.

# pacman -Ss chromium
extra/chromium 48.0.2564.116-1
    The open-source project behind Google Chrome, an attempt at creating a safer, faster, and more stable browser
extra/qt5-webengine 5.5.1-9 (qt qt5)
    Provides support for web applications using the Chromium browser project
community/chromium-bsu 0.9.15.1-2
    A fast paced top scrolling shooter
community/chromium-chromevox latest-1
    Causes the Chromium web browser to automatically install and update the ChromeVox screen reader extention. Note: This
    package does not contain the extension code.
community/fcitx-mozc 2.17.2313.102-1
    Fcitx Module of A Japanese Input Method for Chromium OS, Windows, Mac and Linux (the Open Source Edition of Google Japanese
    Input)

The chromium package is coming from ArchLinux extra repo.

Alternatively, we can use the following option to get the detailed information about the package.

# pacman -Si chromium
Repository      : extra
Name            : chromium
Version         : 48.0.2564.116-1
Description     : The open-source project behind Google Chrome, an attempt at creating a safer, faster, and more stable browser
Architecture    : x86_64
URL             : http://www.chromium.org/
Licenses        : BSD
Groups          : None
Provides        : None
Depends On      : gtk2  nss  alsa-lib  xdg-utils  bzip2  libevent  libxss  icu  libexif  libgcrypt  ttf-font  systemd  dbus
                  flac  snappy  speech-dispatcher  pciutils  libpulse  harfbuzz  libsecret  libvpx  perl  perl-file-basedir
                  desktop-file-utils  hicolor-icon-theme
Optional Deps   : kdebase-kdialog: needed for file dialogs in KDE
                  gnome-keyring: for storing passwords in GNOME keyring
                  kwallet: for storing passwords in KWallet
Conflicts With  : None
Replaces        : None
Download Size   : 44.42 MiB
Installed Size  : 172.44 MiB
Packager        : Evangelos Foutras 
Build Date      : Fri 19 Feb 2016 04:17:12 AM IST
Validated By    : MD5 Sum  SHA-256 Sum  Signature

The chromium package is coming from ArchLinux extra repo.

How Do We Find Out The Installed Packages Came From Which Repository on Debian Based Systems?

It can be done in two ways on Debian based systems such as Ubuntu, LinuxMint, etc.,

Method-1: Using apt-cache Command

The apt-cache command can display much of the information stored in APT’s internal database. This information is a sort of cache since it is gathered from the different sources listed in the sources.list file. This happens during the apt update operation.

$ apt-cache policy python3
python3:
  Installed: 3.6.3-0ubuntu2
  Candidate: 3.6.3-0ubuntu3
  Version table:
     3.6.3-0ubuntu3 500
        500 http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu artful-updates/main amd64 Packages
 *** 3.6.3-0ubuntu2 500
        500 http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu artful/main amd64 Packages
        100 /var/lib/dpkg/status

The python3 package is coming from Ubuntu updates repo.

Method-2: Using apt Command

APT command stands for Advanced Packaging Tool (APT) which is replacement for apt-get, like how DNF came to picture instead of YUM. It’s feature rich command-line tools with included all the futures in one command (APT) such as apt-cache, apt-search, dpkg, apt-cdrom, apt-config, apt-key, etc..,. and several other unique features. For example we can easily install .dpkg packages through APT but we can’t do through Apt-Get similar more features are included into APT command. APT-GET replaced by APT Due to lock of futures missing in apt-get which was not solved.

$ apt -a show notepadqq
Package: notepadqq
Version: 1.3.2-1~artful1
Priority: optional
Section: editors
Maintainer: Daniele Di Sarli 
Installed-Size: 1,352 kB
Depends: notepadqq-common (= 1.3.2-1~artful1), coreutils (>= 8.20), libqt5svg5 (>= 5.2.1), libc6 (>= 2.14), libgcc1 (>= 1:3.0), libqt5core5a (>= 5.9.0~beta), libqt5gui5 (>= 5.7.0), libqt5network5 (>= 5.2.1), libqt5printsupport5 (>= 5.2.1), libqt5webkit5 (>= 5.6.0~rc), libqt5widgets5 (>= 5.2.1), libstdc++6 (>= 5.2)
Download-Size: 356 kB
APT-Sources: http://ppa.launchpad.net/notepadqq-team/notepadqq/ubuntu artful/main amd64 Packages
Description: Notepad++-like editor for Linux
 Text editor with support for multiple programming
 languages, multiple encodings and plugin support.

Package: notepadqq
Version: 1.2.0-1~artful1
Status: install ok installed
Priority: optional
Section: editors
Maintainer: Daniele Di Sarli 
Installed-Size: 1,352 kB
Depends: notepadqq-common (= 1.2.0-1~artful1), coreutils (>= 8.20), libqt5svg5 (>= 5.2.1), libc6 (>= 2.14), libgcc1 (>= 1:3.0), libqt5core5a (>= 5.9.0~beta), libqt5gui5 (>= 5.7.0), libqt5network5 (>= 5.2.1), libqt5printsupport5 (>= 5.2.1), libqt5webkit5 (>= 5.6.0~rc), libqt5widgets5 (>= 5.2.1), libstdc++6 (>= 5.2)
Homepage: http://notepadqq.altervista.org
Download-Size: unknown
APT-Manual-Installed: yes
APT-Sources: /var/lib/dpkg/status
Description: Notepad++-like editor for Linux
 Text editor with support for multiple programming
 languages, multiple encodings and plugin support.

The notepadqq package is coming from Launchpad PPA.

Prakash Subramanian

Prakash Subramanian is a Linux lover and has 3.5+ years of experience in linux server administration with major Linux distribution such as (RHEL, CentOS, Ubuntu). He is currently working as a Senior L2 Linux Server administrator.

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