Tuptime – A Tool To Report The Historical And Statistical Running Time Of Linux System

Beginning of this month we written an article about system uptime that helps user to check how long your Linux system has been running without downtime? when the system is up and what date. This can be done using 11 methods.

uptime is one of the very famous commands, which everyone use when there is a requirement to check the Linux server uptime.

But it won’t shows historical and statistical running time of Linux system, that’s why tuptime is came to picture.

server uptime is very important when the server running with critical applications such as online portals.

Suggested Read : 11 Methods To Find System/Server Uptime In Linux

What Is tuptime?

Tuptime is a tool for report the historical and statistical running time of the system, keeping it between restarts. Like uptime command but with more interesting output.

tuptime Features

  • Count system startups
  • Register first boot time (a.k.a. installation time)
  • Count nicely and accidentally shutdowns
  • Uptime and downtime percentage since first boot time
  • Accumulated system uptime, downtime and total
  • Largest, shortest and average uptime and downtime
  • Current uptime
  • Print formatted table or list with most of the previous values
  • Register used kernels
  • Narrow reports since and/or until a given startup or timestamp
  • Reports in csv

Prerequisites

Make sure your system should have installed Python3 as a prerequisites. If no, install it using your distribution package manager.

Suggested Read : 3 Methods To Install Latest Python3 Package On CentOS 6 System

How To Install tuptime

Few distributions offer tuptime package but it may be bit older version. I would advise you to install latest available version to avail all the features using the below method.

Clone tuptime repository from github.

# git clone https://github.com/rfrail3/tuptime.git

Copy executable file from tuptime/src/tuptime to /usr/bin/ and assign 755 permission.

# cp tuptime/src/tuptime /usr/bin/tuptime
# chmod 755 /usr/bin/tuptime 

All scripts, units and related files are provided inside this repo so, copy and past the necessary files in the appropriate location to get full functionality of tuptime utility.

Add tuptime user because it doesn’t run as a daemon, at least, it only need execution when the init manager startup and shutdown the system.

# useradd -d /var/lib/tuptime -s /bin/sh tuptime

Change owner of the db file.

# chown -R tuptime:tuptime /var/lib/tuptime

Copy cron file from tuptime/src/tuptime to /usr/bin/ and assign 644 permission.

# cp tuptime/src/cron.d/tuptime /etc/cron.d/tuptime
# chmod 644 /etc/cron.d/tuptime

Add system service file based on your system initsystem. Use the below command to check if your system is running with systemd or init.

# ps -p 1
  PID TTY          TIME CMD
    1 ?        00:00:03 systemd

# ps -p 1
  PID TTY          TIME CMD
    1 ?        00:00:00 init

If is a system with systemd, copy service file and enable it.

# cp tuptime/src/systemd/tuptime.service /lib/systemd/system/
# chmod 644 /lib/systemd/system/tuptime.service
# systemctl enable tuptime.service

If have upstart system, copy the file:

# cp tuptime/src/init.d/redhat/tuptime /etc/init.d/tuptime
# chmod 755 /etc/init.d/tuptime
# chkconfig --add tuptime
# chkconfig tuptime on

If have init system, copy the file:

# cp tuptime/src/init.d/debian/tuptime /etc/init.d/tuptime
# chmod 755 /etc/init.d/tuptime
# update-rc.d tuptime defaults
# /etc/init.d/tuptime start

How To Use tuptime

Make sure you should run the command with a privileged user. Intially you will get output similar to this.

# tuptime
System startups:        1   since   02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018
System shutdowns:       0 ok   -   0 bad
System uptime:          100.0 %   -   26 days, 5 hours, 31 minutes and 52 seconds
System downtime:        0.0 %   -   0 seconds
System life:            26 days, 5 hours, 31 minutes and 52 seconds

Largest uptime:         26 days, 5 hours, 31 minutes and 52 seconds   from   02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018
Shortest uptime:        26 days, 5 hours, 31 minutes and 52 seconds   from   02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018
Average uptime:         26 days, 5 hours, 31 minutes and 52 seconds

Largest downtime:       0 seconds
Shortest downtime:      0 seconds
Average downtime:       0 seconds

Current uptime:         26 days, 5 hours, 31 minutes and 52 seconds   since   02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018

Details:

  • System startups: Total number of system startups from since to until date. Until is joined if is used in a narrow range.
  • System shutdowns: Total number of shutdowns done correctly or incorrectly. The separator usually points to the state of last shutdown (<-) ok, (->) bad.
  • System uptime: Percentage of uptime and time counter.
  • System downtime: Percentage of downtime and time counter.
  • System life: Time counter since first startup date until last.
  • Largest/Shortest uptime: Time counter and date with the largest/shortest uptime register.
  • Largest/Shortest downtime: Time counter and date with the largest/shortest downtime register.
  • Average uptime/downtime: Time counter with the average time.
  • Current uptime: Actual time counter and date since registered boot date.

If you do the same a few days after some reboot, the output may will be more similar to this.

# tuptime
System startups:        3   since   02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018
System shutdowns:       0 ok   ->   2 bad
System uptime:          97.0 %   -   28 days, 4 hours, 6 minutes and 0 seconds
System downtime:        3.0 %   -   20 hours, 54 minutes and 22 seconds
System life:            29 days, 1 hour, 0 minutes and 23 seconds

Largest uptime:         26 days, 5 hours, 32 minutes and 57 seconds   from   02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018
Shortest uptime:        1 hour, 31 minutes and 12 seconds   from   02:17:11 AM 05/11/2018
Average uptime:         9 days, 9 hours, 22 minutes and 0 seconds

Largest downtime:       20 hours, 51 minutes and 58 seconds   from   08:20:57 AM 05/08/2018
Shortest downtime:      2 minutes and 24 seconds   from   02:14:47 AM 05/11/2018
Average downtime:       10 hours, 27 minutes and 11 seconds

Current uptime:         1 hour, 31 minutes and 12 seconds   since   02:17:11 AM 05/11/2018

Enumerate as table each startup number, startup date, uptime, shutdown date, end status and downtime. Multiple order options can be combined together.

# tuptime -t
No.             Startup Date                                        Uptime            Shutdown Date   End                              Downtime

1     02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018   26 days, 5 hours, 32 minutes and 57 seconds   08:20:57 AM 05/08/2018   BAD   20 hours, 51 minutes and 58 seconds
2     05:12:55 AM 05/09/2018      1 day, 21 hours, 1 minute and 52 seconds   02:14:47 AM 05/11/2018   BAD              2 minutes and 24 seconds
3     02:17:11 AM 05/11/2018             1 hour, 34 minutes and 33 seconds

Enumerate as list each startup number, startup date, uptime, shutdown date, end status and offtime. Multiple order options can be combined together.

# tuptime -l
Startup:  1  at  02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018
Uptime:   26 days, 5 hours, 32 minutes and 57 seconds
Shutdown: BAD  at  08:20:57 AM 05/08/2018
Downtime: 20 hours, 51 minutes and 58 seconds

Startup:  2  at  05:12:55 AM 05/09/2018
Uptime:   1 day, 21 hours, 1 minute and 52 seconds
Shutdown: BAD  at  02:14:47 AM 05/11/2018
Downtime: 2 minutes and 24 seconds

Startup:  3  at  02:17:11 AM 05/11/2018
Uptime:   1 hour, 34 minutes and 36 seconds

To print kernel information with tuptime output.

# tuptime -k
System startups:        3   since   02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018
System shutdowns:       0 ok   ->   2 bad
System uptime:          97.0 %   -   28 days, 4 hours, 11 minutes and 25 seconds
System downtime:        3.0 %   -   20 hours, 54 minutes and 22 seconds
System life:            29 days, 1 hour, 5 minutes and 47 seconds
System kernels:         1

Largest uptime:         26 days, 5 hours, 32 minutes and 57 seconds   from   02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018
...with kernel:         Linux-2.6.32-696.23.1.el6.x86_64-x86_64-with-centos-6.9-Final
Shortest uptime:        1 hour, 36 minutes and 36 seconds   from   02:17:11 AM 05/11/2018
...with kernel:         Linux-2.6.32-696.23.1.el6.x86_64-x86_64-with-centos-6.9-Final
Average uptime:         9 days, 9 hours, 23 minutes and 48 seconds

Largest downtime:       20 hours, 51 minutes and 58 seconds   from   08:20:57 AM 05/08/2018
...with kernel:         Linux-2.6.32-696.23.1.el6.x86_64-x86_64-with-centos-6.9-Final
Shortest downtime:      2 minutes and 24 seconds   from   02:14:47 AM 05/11/2018
...with kernel:         Linux-2.6.32-696.23.1.el6.x86_64-x86_64-with-centos-6.9-Final
Average downtime:       10 hours, 27 minutes and 11 seconds

Current uptime:         1 hour, 36 minutes and 36 seconds   since   02:17:11 AM 05/11/2018
...with kernel:         Linux-2.6.32-696.23.1.el6.x86_64-x86_64-with-centos-6.9-Final

Change the date format. By default it’s printed based on system locales.

# tuptime -d %d/%m/%y %H:%M:%S
System startups:        3   since   12/04/18
System shutdowns:       0 ok   ->   2 bad
System uptime:          97.0 %   -   28 days, 4 hours, 15 minutes and 18 seconds
System downtime:        3.0 %   -   20 hours, 54 minutes and 22 seconds
System life:            29 days, 1 hour, 9 minutes and 41 seconds

Largest uptime:         26 days, 5 hours, 32 minutes and 57 seconds   from   12/04/18
Shortest uptime:        1 hour, 40 minutes and 30 seconds   from   11/05/18
Average uptime:         9 days, 9 hours, 25 minutes and 6 seconds

Largest downtime:       20 hours, 51 minutes and 58 seconds   from   08/05/18
Shortest downtime:      2 minutes and 24 seconds   from   11/05/18
Average downtime:       10 hours, 27 minutes and 11 seconds

Current uptime:         1 hour, 40 minutes and 30 seconds   since   11/05/18

Print information about the internals of tuptime. It’s good for debugging how it gets the variables.

# tuptime -v
INFO:Arguments: {'endst': 0, 'seconds': None, 'table': False, 'csv': False, 'ts': None, 'silent': False, 'order': False, 'since': 0, 'kernel': False, 'reverse': False, 'until': 0, 'db_file': '/var/lib/tuptime/tuptime.db', 'lst': False, 'tu': None, 'date_format': '%X %x', 'update': True}
INFO:Linux system
INFO:uptime = 5773.54
INFO:btime = 1526019431
INFO:kernel = Linux-2.6.32-696.23.1.el6.x86_64-x86_64-with-centos-6.9-Final
INFO:Execution user = 0
INFO:Directory exists = /var/lib/tuptime
INFO:DB file exists = /var/lib/tuptime/tuptime.db
INFO:Last btime from db = 1526019431
INFO:Last uptime from db = 5676.04
INFO:Drift over btime = 0
INFO:System wasn't restarted. Updating db values...
System startups:        3   since   02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018
System shutdowns:       0 ok   ->   2 bad
System uptime:          97.0 %   -   28 days, 4 hours, 11 minutes and 2 seconds
System downtime:        3.0 %   -   20 hours, 54 minutes and 22 seconds
System life:            29 days, 1 hour, 5 minutes and 25 seconds

Largest uptime:         26 days, 5 hours, 32 minutes and 57 seconds   from   02:48:00 AM 04/12/2018
Shortest uptime:        1 hour, 36 minutes and 14 seconds   from   02:17:11 AM 05/11/2018
Average uptime:         9 days, 9 hours, 23 minutes and 41 seconds

Largest downtime:       20 hours, 51 minutes and 58 seconds   from   08:20:57 AM 05/08/2018
Shortest downtime:      2 minutes and 24 seconds   from   02:14:47 AM 05/11/2018
Average downtime:       10 hours, 27 minutes and 11 seconds

Current uptime:         1 hour, 36 minutes and 14 seconds   since   02:17:11 AM 05/11/2018

Print a quick reference of the command line parameters.

# tuptime -h
Usage: tuptime [options]

Options:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -c, --csv             csv output
  -d DATE_FORMAT, --date=DATE_FORMAT
                        date format output
  -f FILE, --filedb=FILE
                        database file
  -g, --graceful        register a gracefully shutdown
  -k, --kernel          print kernel information
  -l, --list            enumerate system life as list
  -n, --noup            avoid update values
  -o TYPE, --order=TYPE
                        order enumerate by []
  -r, --reverse         reverse order
  -s, --seconds         output time in seconds and epoch
  -S SINCE, --since=SINCE
                        restric since this register number
  -t, --table           enumerate system life as table
  --tsince=TIMESTAMP    restrict since this epoch timestamp
  --tuntil=TIMESTAMP    restrict until this epoch timestamp
  -U UNTIL, --until=UNTIL
                        restrict until this register number
  -v, --verbose         verbose output
  -V, --version         show version
  -x, --silent          update values into db without output

Prakash Subramanian

Prakash Subramanian is a Linux lover and has 3.5+ years of experience in linux server administration with major Linux distribution such as (RHEL, CentOS, Ubuntu). He is currently working as a Senior L2 Linux Server administrator.

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